IRS Hardship Program: Eligibility and Program Details

IRS Hardship Program: Eligibility and Program Details

As the tax filing date for 2023 approaches, you may be experiencing the burden of tax debts owed to the IRS, making it difficult to catch up and stay current with payments. If this is the case, it is important to know that you may be eligible for the IRS Hardship Program, which can offer some relief and take the weight off your shoulders. This program allows taxpayers experiencing financial hardship to pay off their tax debt through an installment agreement or an Offer in Compromise. To determine eligibility, the IRS will review the taxpayer’s income, expenses, assets, and liabilities on a case-by-case basis. If you are struggling to pay off back taxes, the IRS Hardship Program may provide the assistance needed to get back on track with your payments.

Finishline Tax Solutions can help you navigate the process of applying for the IRS Hardship Program and getting the tax relief you need.

 

The IRS Hardship Program is a program that allows taxpayers to pay off their tax debts through an installment agreement or an Offer in Compromise (OIC) if they are experiencing financial hardship.

Taxpayers who are experiencing financial hardship and are unable to pay their tax debt in full may be eligible for the program. Eligibility is determined on a case-by-case basis, taking into consideration the taxpayer's income, expenses, assets, and liabilities.

An installment agreement is a payment plan that allows taxpayers to pay off their tax debt over time, rather than in one lump sum. The payment plan may last up to 72 months, and the taxpayer must make monthly payments.

An Offer in Compromise (OIC) is an agreement between the taxpayer and the IRS that settles the tax debt for less than the full amount owed. To qualify for an OIC, the taxpayer must demonstrate that they are unable to pay the full amount and that accepting the OIC is in the best interest of both the taxpayer and the government.

To apply for the IRS Hardship Program, taxpayers must complete Form 433-A, Collection Information Statement for Wage Earners and Self-Employed Individuals, or Form 433-F, Collection Information Statement. These forms require detailed financial information about the taxpayer's income, expenses, assets, and liabilities. The forms can be submitted online or by mail.

If a taxpayer does not qualify for the IRS Hardship Program, they may still be able to arrange a payment plan with the IRS or explore other options, such as an Offer in Compromise or bankruptcy.

Yes, interest and penalties will continue to accrue while on the IRS Hardship Program. However, the IRS may waive or reduce penalties in some cases.

If a taxpayer defaults on their installment agreement while on the IRS Hardship Program, the IRS may take collection actions, such as filing a Notice of Federal Tax Lien or issuing a levy on the taxpayer's wages or bank account.

The IRS has 10 years from the date the tax was assessed to collect the tax debt. However, the collection period may be extended in certain cases, such as if the taxpayer enters into an installment agreement or an Offer in Compromise.

Yes, it is possible to qualify for the IRS hardship program more than once, but it will depend on your specific situation. If you have previously entered into an installment agreement or Offer in Compromise and are experiencing financial hardship again, you may be able to apply for the IRS hardship program again. However, the IRS will consider factors such as your payment history and current financial situation before approving your application. It's important to note that you must be current on all your tax filings and payments to be eligible for the program.